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Julie Palmer

 Tags: fitness tips

Maybe you’ve been strolling through life thinking that one day you will get serious about your health. One day you will get a gym membership, join your friends for a run, stop drinking so much beer and eating chicken wings every Tuesday night, and potentially even try a veggie burger. Maybe you will drink more water than Red Bull and get to bed before 1 AM.

Maybe you got away with this sort of lifestyle in your younger years or you are in your young years and think you are beating the system. The fact is, it won’t last. If it hasn’t happened already, you will eventually feel warn down, exhausted, your ability to focus on work or other important things might become challenging, your stress might consume you, your healthy friends may leave you behind, and your health will likely decline. At this point, your quality of life, your zest for life, is probably not all that.

How long are you going to live like this?

Maybe you can change your lifestyle before your (poor) health changes your life.

In my eyes it is easier to start now rather than wait for your doctor to tell you to exercise and change your diet because you have high blood pressure and are pre-diabetic.

I know, you have been living like this for your entire adult life, how do you change now? Well, I concur that it isn’t easy but I assure you it can be done. In my job, I work with the unhealthiest of the population, those who already let their (poor) health change their life. And I watch them evolve from terribly unhealthy to fit people who are taking their lives by storm.

It is all about your frame of mind. You have to think like a fit person. It may sound crazy but I am telling you this is what I do with my clients. Your mind is a powerful tool. Put it to work.


Start by thinking about what you are missing out on. What do you wish you could do but can’t because your health holds you back? Is it skiing, running in a race with your teenage child, comfortably traveling on an airplane, or maybe it is as simple as taking the stairs without getting winded or being able to get down on the floor and play with your kids? Whatever it is focus on it. Now focus on changing your frame of mind around being fit. If you think like a fit person you can be a fit person. Here are 10 ways you can get started thinking like a fit person:


  1. As soon as you start exercising begin to think of yourself as a fit person- because that is what fit people do. They exercise. Regularly.
  2. As soon as you start making healthy food choices, think of yourself as a fit person. Because fit people make healthy food choices. Or at least the best choice that they have available to them at the time.
  3. When you are at work, take time out for a stress relieving 5-minute walk. Because that is what fit people do. They manage their stress.
  4. Take a bottle of water with you everywhere you go (and drink it). Notice who has water with them in the strangest places?
  5. Bring your lunch and snacks for the day because fit people like to know where their food came from and what they are eating.
  6. Hang out with fit people because fit people are attracted to other fit people.
  7. Get active with your friends. Because fit people spend time with people who will use their time wisely.
  8. Think adventure. Fit people love an adventure.
  9. Stretch. Fit people are always stretching. They stop in doorways to stretch their chest and shoulders. They put their foot up on a park bench and stretch their hamstrings while waiting to cross the street. They reach overhead to stretch their back while they are waiting for their tea to steep. Fit people know the value of stretching.
  10. Stand up. Fit people sit as little as possible typically because they have too much energy to sit for long periods but also because it is bad for your health. And fit people do things that are good for their health.



About Us

RivalHealth is a fitness-based wellness platform that engages employees with daily exercise and nutrition activities and sustains engagement through social interaction, challenges, incentives and outcomes.